What is the normal thickness of plantar fascia on msk ultrasound?

What is the normal thickness of plantar fascia on msk ultrasound?

Everyday MSK
What is the normal thickness of plantar fascia on msk ultrasound? Under musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging, the normal plantar fascia appears as a taut, fibrous band extending from the calcaneus to the metatarsal heads distally. It is characterized by a homogenous, smooth, uniform gray echotexture. Deep to the fascia are the mixed echoes of the foot intrinsic muscles including the flexor digitorum brevis and quadratus plantae. Normal plantar fascia thickness is typically 3-4mm. Thickening, hypoechogenicity, and loss of uniform smoothness, especially in the medial band of the tissue, are indicators of fasciitis/fasciopathy that can cause foot pain. Questions or comments about foot pain or injuries? Send us a message If you have a friend or teammate who could use this information, please share it with them. Thanks!
Read More
What can cause pain on the heel?

What can cause pain on the heel?

Everyday MSK
What can cause pain on the heel? With pain on the bottom of the heel, the instinctive reaction might be to attribute it to the ubiquitous culprit—plantar fasciitis. While this condition is undoubtedly common, it's not the sole source of heel discomfort. Two often-overlooked causes deserve awareness: heel fat pad syndrome and Baxter's nerve entrapment. The trouble with this trio is that they are commonly considered solo acts. However, they tend to run together in people who run, hike, or spend countless hours on their feet. This article provides self-tests that can help tease out the most prominent problem. Questions or comments about foot pain or injuries? Send us a message If you have a friend or teammate who could use this information, please share it with them. Thanks!
Read More
How do I know if I need wider shoes?

How do I know if I need wider shoes?

Everyday MSK
How do I know if I need wider shoes? Does your foot spill over the liner? Remove the liner insert from the shoe and stand on it. The size and shape of the liner should match your foot all the way around. Any spillage of your foot or toes over an edge of the liner means that the shoe will have to stretch to accommodate the difference, or it won’t stretch and your foot will get squeezed with every step. Foot "overhang" is likely to cause blisters and pain down the road. Foot compression, over time, may lead to bunions, plantar fasciitis, or Morton’s neuroma conditions. If you notice spillage, trade up a size or width of the shoe until you find the one with the liner that traces your…
Read More
When it’s not plantar fasciitis; other sneaky causes of heel pain

When it’s not plantar fasciitis; other sneaky causes of heel pain

Ankle-Foot, Articles, Running, Tactical
When it's not plantar fasciitis; other sneaky causes of heel pain This article was originally published in The Raider Patch: Magazine of the U.S. Marine Raider Association If you feel pain on the bottom of your heel, the instinctive reaction might be to attribute it to the ubiquitous culprit—plantar fasciitis. While this condition is undoubtedly common, it's not the sole source of heel discomfort. Two often-overlooked causes deserve awareness: heel fat pad syndrome and Baxter's nerve entrapment.   The trouble with this trio is that they are commonly considered solo acts. However, they tend to run together in people who run, ruck, or spend countless hours on their feet. In this article, we'll go over each problem, identify key similarities and differences of each, and introduce self-treatment options that you can…
Read More
Are my shoes (or boots) causing blisters?

Are my shoes (or boots) causing blisters?

Ankle-Foot, Articles, Running, Tactical
Question: Are my shoes (or boots) causing blisters? A common cause of blisters is shoes or boots that are too tight or too loose. One of our clients is a "seasonal" runner who routinely starts training for his annual running/physical fitness test about two months out. This year, he began noticing blisters on his pinky toes.  Though he ramped up his miles abruptly (going from 0 to 15 miles per week…in 2 weeks),  he denied experiencing foot blisters since way back in boot camp. He had, however, bought a new pair of shoes for his upcoming physical fitness test. Answer: Check the shoe’s liner 1. Remove the liner insert from the shoe and stand on it. The size and shape of the liner should match your foot all the way around.…
Read More
How to stretch for plantar fasciitis: an easy technique fix to relieve heel pain

How to stretch for plantar fasciitis: an easy technique fix to relieve heel pain

Ankle-Foot, Articles
How to stretch for plantar fasciitis: an easy technique fix to relieve heel pain If you have plantar fasciitis, you may have been told to stretch your foot as part of your treatment plan. If you are doing the exercise but not feeling much benefit, a simple tweak to your technique may help. Why your stretch might not be working The primary exercise that most people are taught for plantar fasciitis is to pull all the toes backward.  Typical stretch - all toes together But, the fascia tissue has several bands that branch out from the heel bone. These bands have different lengths and angles that make it difficult to get a good stretch when grouping them all together as one:  Since the plantar fascia is made up of multiple…
Read More
Selection Injuries: The Good, Bad and Ugly, Part 3 (Shin and Ankle)

Selection Injuries: The Good, Bad and Ugly, Part 3 (Shin and Ankle)

Ankle-Foot, Articles, Running, Tactical
Selection Injuries: The Good, Bad and Ugly, Part 3 (Shin and Ankle) Originally published by SOFLETE. You can read the article on their website here. Shin splints are the worst! They are one of the reasons I became a physical therapist (to find a solution to my own problem), and are a leading, not-so-fond memory of boot camp for many a client through the years. The good news about shin splints is that once the cause has been identified (and eliminated), the pain disappears. The bad news? What if they’re not shin splints at all? How do you eliminate a problem if you don’t know what the problem is?  The importance of identifying the underlying problem - and not just the pain - has been a recurring theme throughout this…
Read More